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Mother dearest
05/03/2016|CultureDad LifefamilyGeneral thoughtsKidsMoustacheness

Mother dearest

Mother dearest

In lieu of Mother’s Day on Sunday, I want to take a moment to express my appreciation for the mothers in my life.

When I was a child, my mother was a hard-working woman. Although she worked multiple jobs with inconvenient hours, she was able to show her love and spent her time with my brother and I. If I remember correctly I believe there was a time where she left a job as it was cutting in on her ability to spend time with her boys. That is some sort of sacrifice. It’s time that we show some gratitude for all the sacrifices that our moms have made. My wife, who is the best mom to our three children, sacrifices her time and energy to fill each kid independently with love, encouragement, self-worth, and courage. As most kids, they don’t see what she does or appreciate what she does. She is up early and to bed late preparing lunches, laying out clothes that match (unlike when I dress them), making sure that homework is completed and reviewed, and even has time to “do hair”. All this is done before they head off to school. When she returns home, she has been on her feet all day teaching other people’s children as a kindergarten teacher, she makes sure that homework and projects are begun, and snacks are made and each kid gets what they crave. Depending on the day she volunteers as a Girl Scout troop leader, takes them to their appropriate after school activity and works on her own education. How she does it all I have no clue. I’m tired just typing it all, and I’m sure I missed something.

I have tried to fill her shoes when she is out-of-town for a day or two. It is chaos and pandemonium.

It seems like the job of mom and being unappreciated go hand in hand. But why is that? Are we just that selfish as children or is it that we don’t understand all that goes into doing what she does. I believe it to be some of both.

Thinking back to when I was a child, things just happened. Food would magically appear in the refrigerator, my lunch box and the dinner table. Clothes would find their way back into a folded stack on my bed. There was something mystical about the daily operations of the house. That is until I turned 5 or 6. That is when I was to begin participating in such mysterious tasks and found out that there was a lot of behind the scenes work. The lessons of cleaning, folding and taking care of the house have stuck with me to this day.

I have never really been one to express much in the way of emotions (this is where my wife gasps jokingly). After thinking and writing about how much my mother did for me and how much my wife does for my kids, I count myself lucky to have both in my life. I would like to take this time to say thank you to the moms in my life. Also this is your fair warning that Mother’s Day is on Sunday today. That’s 5 days away. Be thinking of your special mother and don’t just buy her something just to get her a gift. Do something with her like lunch or dinner with your full attention. Tell her thank you for all she has done. Now get to work!

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  • Tom Cottle
    05/04/2016 at 7:03 AM

    Good job! Both mom and dad did the job switch thing I believe for us. It is true that from our perspectives the world revolved around us at our birth and then gradually got expanded to realize these guardians, protectors, the ones we get mad at when we do not get our way, the disciplinarians… The parents were there to guide us and love us and show us how to interact with this thing called life. Then one day it happens. Or in my case I hope it happens that we too become the parent. I guess that honor thy mother and father thing from that big Holy book is important after all.

  • Barry Cottle
    06/23/2016 at 11:05 AM

    Chris, you are a wise man. You must take after your dad? This is a great article. Most of us guys do not have a clue what their other half goes through as a working Mom. I salute you both on getting it done.
    I Love You,
    Dad

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